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20 May 16 Woolston Eyes NR- Since the Last Time
20th May 2016 - 0 comments
Seeing as the last time I put pen to paper so to speak is over six months ago, it's about time I actually did something about it.

It's not that I haven't been out or taken any photographs because I have, I think work was demanding and I just needed to rest in my spare time.

So a few weeks back I retired from work after nearly 46 years in more or less the same place, it had changed names a few times and I'd risen up the ranks but it was time to go and so I have!

Since then I've been thinking about starting the blog again but couldn't make my mind up about whether I should continue from where I finished or start afresh.

After due consideration I've decided to include photos that I've taken during the last six months to date and hopefully as I do feel more refreshed now I'll maintain a better account of visits to Woolston Eyes and other places in the future!

10 October 15


Pied Wagtail


Moorhen


Greylag Geese


Greylag Geese


Grey Heron

21 November 15


Shelduck


Teal

17 January 16

From the photos it looks like it had been a cold day!



I can't believe it, I must have walked and as there aren't any bird photos I obviously didn't take the big lens, which would make it easier to walk!



Not only had I walked but nobody had crossed the footbridge before me, another first!



I just though the tree looked nice.



Winter Berries

30 January 16

I think this must have been another cold day as there aren't any photos of birds on the water, so I'm assuming it was frozen. Hence photos of the birds on and around the feeders by the John Morgan Hide.


Brambling


Brambling


Greenfinch


Greenfinch


Long-tailed tit


Magpie

12 March 16

Looking back at the photos I had taken I think I'd decided to try and take photos of birds in action, although there is always the exception to the rule!


Moorhen on the run


Shelduck coming in to splashdown


Shelduck impersonating the Red Arrows


Black-headed Gull coming in to land


Mallard

Some of the flora


Snowdrops


Snowdrops


Daffodil

20 March 16

It looks like a day of Geese and Gulls with the odd duck and a bit of flora thrown in just for good measure.


Greylag Goose


Greylag Goose


Greylag Goose


Black-headed Gull


Coot


Lesser black-backed Gull


Lesser black-backed Gull


Greylag Goose


Greylag Goose


Gadwall


Greylag Goose





04 April 16


Chiffchaff


Gadwall


Little Grebe - surely it can't be doing the "goose step"


Tufted duck


Lapwing


Lesser black-backed gull

10 April 16

Obviously not much action on this day!!



I thought the tree looked nice against the blue sky

13 April 16


Chiffchaff - catching a fly



The view from the south viewing screen, a misty start to the day.


Crow


Robin - who is viewing who?


Juvenile Gull


Greylag Goose


Black-necked Grebe

A pair looking resplendent in the golden reflection of the reeds, it would have been a nice photograph if they had been just that bit closer! Always moaning!!

16 April 16


Chiffchaff


Lesser black-backed Gull


Black-necked grebe


Pied Wagtail


Mallard and chicks


Mallard chicks

20 April 16

I think the spring migration and the hatching season had started in earnest.


Little Gull


Little Gull


Lapwing

23 April 16


Little Gull


Black-headed Gull - taking a dislike to a shelduck!


Little Gull

25 April 16

A day of gulls and chicks.


Black-headed gulls put up by a Buzzard or Harrier


Greylag Goose


Greylag Goose


Shelduck


Lesser Black-bached and Black-headed Gulls


Juvenile Gull


Greylag Goose


Greylag Goose


Greylag Goose


Greylag Goose

26 April 16


Juvenile Gull in flight


Little Gull


Little Gull


Little Gull

Shows the distinctive dark W on the wings when in flight


Gadwall splashdown


Greylag in flight

03 May 16

Plenty of chicks again.


Greylag Goose


Coot with nesting material


Coot on the run


Greylag Goose


Greylag Goose


Grey Heron

05 May 16

Some of the flora on No3 Bed.


Cowslips on the north meadow


Bluebells


Bluebells

07 May 16


Whitethroat


Magpie


Greylag Goose


Greylag Goose


Cowslip


Pheasant

12 May 16

A day when I was in attendance for the appearance of a Marsh Harrier


Wren


Great crested grebe


Pochard


Pochard


Pochard


Whitethroat

A series of Marsh harrier photographs that was too far away for good photography, if only it was closer! Just for information, the photographs were taken with Canon 7D Mk11, 500mm f4.0 Mk11 lens and 1.4 extender, equivalent to an 1120mm lens on a full frame camera. Very heavy cropping was also required!















14 May 16


Pink footed Goose

19 May 16

It looks like it was a Pochard day but I'll start with the Mallard!


Mallard and ducklings


Mallard Duckling


Pochard


Pochard


Pochard


Pochard

Well if you've made it this far I'm really surprised but extremely pleased!

thanks for looking.

Andy
04 Oct 15 Woolston Eyes
06th October 2015 - 0 comments
After the autumnal mist on Saturday I was expecting the same on Sunday, however it was a very pleasant morning and no mist.

The water on No3 bed was much lower than my previous visit probably two weeks ago. Looking from the south screen, there weren’t any birds on the south pool and the nearest birds were probably on a level with the tower hide.

I moved swiftly on, well that may be an exaggeration, age and an hefty bag and camera has put paid to that!!

I eventually reached the John Morgan Hide and although there wasn’t anything on the scrape there were a few black tailed godwits just off the far end of the scrape.


Black-tailed Godwit

For once I dropped in lucky as a Kingfisher perched itself not too far away and I did get some nice shots. The only drawback being that I had the 2x converter on so some quality was lost, some photographers are never happy!

Kingfisher


Kingfisher

There were plenty of Lapwings doing the “Lapwing Fly”


Lapwing


Lapwing

During the morning loads of Geese flew in mainly Canada Geese, I think Woolston had more than it’s fair share of geese particularly the Canadas!


Canada Geese


Greylag Goose


Mute Swan


Splash down

At one stage it looked like all of the water in front of the hide was covered in Geese, unfortunately I didn’t have another lens with me to take a decent photograph of the scene. So I had to make do with a few photos with the 500mm.


Canada Geese


Geese


Geese

Thanks for reading

Andy
20 Sep 2015 Woolston Eyes
20th September 2015 - 0 comments
I think it's about 2 months since I put anything in the blog or even in the galleries. It's not that I haven't taken any photographs just a loss of motivation to do something with the them!!

Unfortunately I can't remember a lot about most of my visits other than it was a quiet period however I did photograph the Great White Egret at varying distances.

So as I can't remember much there won't be many words just a pictorial view of the last few months.

02 August


Comma


Speckled Wood


Harlequin Ladybird


Ladybird larvae


Cormorant


Hoverfly


Harlequin Ladybird

09 August


Black-tailed Godwit


Lapwings

15 August


Himalayan Balsam (Backlit)


White Ermine moth caterpillar


Lapwing


Black-tailed Godwit


Black-tailed Godwit


Lapwing


Black-tailed Godwit

16 August


Hoverfly


View from John Morgan Hide, white bird just right of centre along the edge of the reeds is Great White Egret


Great White Egret


Great White Egret


Great White Egret


Hoverfly


Butterfly


Common Snipe

28 August


Green Sandpiper


Great White Egret

30 August


Meadow Brown Butterfly


View along the south bank path


Hoverfly


Elderberries


Sunflowers on North Meadow


Sunflowers on North Meadow


Sunflowers on North Meadow


Robin


Hoverfly


Black-tailed Godwit


Black-tailed Godwit


Greylag Goose


Four-banded Longhorn Beetle (Strangalia quadrifasciata)

19 September


Grey Heron


Grey Heron


Canada Goose


Green Sandpiper


Green Sandpiper


Green Sandpiper


Green Sandpiper

Thanks for looking.

Andy
20 July 15 Rixton Claypits & Woolston Eyes Nature Reserves
23rd July 2015 - 0 comments
05th July Rixton Claypits

It’s been nearly 12 months since I last visited Rixton claypits, so a visit was well overdue.

Kestrel & buzzard were apparent while I was walking around and plenty of small birds but I’d gone mainly to find dragonfly, butterfly and basically anything else that caught my attention i.e. no 500mm lens.

I managed to find the last of the northern marsh orchid that were still in flower.


Northern Marsh Orchid (Dactylorhiza purpurella)


Northern Marsh Orchid (Dactylorhiza purpurella)

There were quite a few butterflies on the wing but I only managed to snap a Meadow Brown.


Meadow Brown (Maniola jurtina)

Six Spot Burnett moths were abundant.


Six-Spot Burnet moth (Zygaena filipendulae)

I’d waited about eight years to see Banded Demoiselle never mind photograph one and then I’ve managed to photograph two in the last month or so. Unfortunately I couldn’t get a clear view of it but what the heck.


Banded demoiselle (Calopteryx splendens)

I also saw plenty of Dragonflies and photographed Four-spotted Chaser and Emperor dragonfly, the Emperor being a first .


Four-spotted Chaser (Libellula quadrimaculata)


Emperor Dragonfly (Anax imperator)


Emperor Dragonfly (Anax imperator)

I also spotted a slight movement in of the pools while I was shooting dragonflies which turned out to be a Newt larvae. Something I haven’t seen since I was a lad in short pants, fifty plus years ago.


Newt Larvae

11th July Woolston Eyes

Birds were in short supply and certainly not a lot of action going on, however there was a little ringed plover on the scrape in front of the John Morgan Hide.


Little Ringed Plover (Charadrius dubius)

A pair of great crested grebes and a couple of chicks turned up and other than that it was back to the insects.


Great Crested Grebe (Podiceps cristatus)


Great Crested Grebe (Podiceps cristatus)


Gatekeeper (Pyronia tithonus)


Ladybird larvae


Blue-tailed Damselfly (Ischnura elegans)


Blue-tailed Damselfly (Ischnura elegans)

18th July Woolston Eyes

A day with not many birds about although the Little Ringed Plover was on the furthest scrape.


Little Ringed Plover (Charadrius dubius)

So another day for insects.


Comma (Polygonia c-album)


Leaf Beetle (Oulema obscura)


Hoverfly (Epistrophe grossulariae)


Small Tortoiseshell (Aglais urticae) in flight


Small Tortoiseshell (Aglais urticae) in flight


Hoverfly (Xylota segnis)


Common Cherry Oak Gall

Thanks for reading.

Andy
27 June 15 At The Eyes
28th June 2015 - 0 comments
Tempus fugit and all of that, it had been three weeks since I visited “The Eyes” so I made my way there on Saturday. It’s not the Akamas Peninsula or the Troodos but it has it’s own charm.

I’ve included some photos from my last visit as well as Saturday.

03 June


Great crested grebe


Great crested grebe


Great crested grebe


Coot


Coot


Great crested grebe

27 June


Feather

After I crossed the footbridge there were quite a few damselflies on the wing.


Azure damselfly

On the south pool there was a pair of tufted duck male and female and a few coots and moorhens but not much else and it looks like the water level has dropped somewhat since my last visit.


Tufted duck

As I made my way to the John Morgan hide I noted some sycamore seeds waiting to take flight, I remember playing helicopters with them when I was young.

Helicopters

I was taking my time walking to the Morgan hide as I was looking for insects but nothing much was leaping out of the vegetation and waving at me.


Honey bee

When I reached the John Morgan hide and opened the shutter I was expecting to find it overgrown with vegetation but it had been cut down which was great news.

There were plenty of birds on the scrape but not a lot of anything going on, it was very quiet really.


Black-headed gull


Gadwall in flight (monochrome)

While I was rooting around waiting for some action I did find a weevil to photograph.


Weevil (Phyllobius Pomaceus)

Thanks for reading

Andy
Trip to the Akamas Peninsula
20th June 2015 - 0 comments
Trip to the Akamas Peninsula

We had a full day trip to the Akamas Peninsula through EcoTour Adventures Cyprus which took us up hill and down dale, hills and coast, the best of both worlds.

Our driver for the day was Andreas whom was extremely passionate about the culture and the history of Cyprus and entertained our group throughout the day with his knowledge and wit. Andreas & Chris are both fantastic people with a wealth of experience and are almost walking encyclopaedias when it comes to Cyprus. They like to impart their knowledge and ensure that you have learned something about their beautiful island and enjoyed the experience.

We started our tour by driving north from Paphos through Coral bay and into the Akamas Peninsula; our first stop being the Avakas Gorge. The idea was to be the first group there, which we succeeded in achieving but were followed quite quickly by a number of other groups, it’s obviously an extremely popular destination.

Akamas Peninsula


The Akamas looking from the hills to the coast, a panorama of about 10 shots, hand held

The Akamas National Park lies on the north west coast of Cyprus. It has an area coverage of 230 square kilometres containing valleys, gorges and wide sandy bays. The Akamas peninsula, named after an Athenian warrior and son of Theseus, who arrived here after the Trojan war, is a unique area, both geologically and physiographically and with regard to flora and fauna

The European Council has included it in its Mediterranean Protection Programme. The Cyprus Government has yet to fully declare it as a National Park for tourist and local landowners reasons, although friends of the Earth and Green Peace are lobbying hard for it.

Almost all the geological formations of Cyprus can be found here, from narrow deep valleys, caves and islets to gorges such as that of Avakas, resulting in a real geological mosaic. For this reason the Akamas peninsula is endowed with a unique biodiversity, habitats and ecosystems.

Avakas Gorge



The gorge is found on the western tip of the Akamas Peninsula and this impressive gorge is approximately 18 kilometres from Paphos. The trail leading through the gorge is roughly 2½ kilometres long with sheer rocks on both sides reaching up to 260 feet in height, the narrowest point being 10 feet wide.


In the gorge


Some of the other people on the tour, Patrick & Madi, Malcolm & Eileen

Deep inside the gorge are rare plants and flowers, reptiles, immense cliffs and even wild mountain goats. The walk into the gorge takes about 30 minutes at a leisurely pace, with various stops to identify some of the flora and geological features.


Centaurea akamantis endemic to the Avakas Gorge


Wild goats


Wild goats


An aerial view


sling-tailed agama (Stellagama stellio)

Quite frequently Andreas pulled some leaves from the trees for us to smell, they were well known to most of us but smelled totally different as they were still fresh, so aromatic and almost overpowering at times.


Phoenicean Juniper berries


Unknown berries, Andreas said used for making gum


Unknown

From the Avakas Gorge we drove a relatively short distance to Lara Bay/Beach.

Lara Beach


En-route to Lara Beach


Horse & foal

Andreas gave us an interesting talk about turtle conservation. Lara Bay is an essential Green Turtle and Hawk’s Bill turtle breeding ground; both are endangered species. Provisions are constantly been made for safe sites for the egg laying of these sea creatures.


Turtle nest on Lara Beach

The sand is soft and golden and the sea is crystal clear and clean. To reach this expansive and virtually deserted beach a 4×4 or other vehicle suitable for rough terrain is necessary, a tank springs to mind.


Lara Bay


Lara Beach

There was enough time to swim if you were so inclined but I don’t think anyone tried it, having said that it did look very inviting.


Lara Beach


Into the Hills

From Lara we kept off road and headed inland into the hills through windy, meandering tracks, were wildlife was in abundance. Plenty of birds, Kestrels, Rollers and Hoopoes were noted, along with swifts, swallows, chaffinches, etc.


Kestrel, a bit too far away


Wild dianthus

There were also loads of butterflies and the odd reptile, on both trips we saw Cyprus whip snake. I did take a photo of one but from some distance inside the jeep, unfortunately I hadn’t focused correctly and it looks more like a crack in the road than a metre long snake!! An excuse to return perhaps and soon.


Cyprus whip snake


A very poor specimen of a Swallowtail butterfly

We were heading into the hills for lunch, to the village of Steni but first visiting a small church, a 15th-Century Byzantine architectural style chapel of Agia Ekaterini (St Katherine) near the village of Kritou Terra.


Chapel of Agia Ekaterini (St Katherine)





We had a very nice lunch at a taverna in Steni, the Neromylos Café, I believe. I can’t remember what it was I had exactly but it was a mixture of various meats, sausage and vegetables that aren’t available anywhere else, I suppose it would be the house speciality or the chefs signature dish. All I know was that I was totally stuffed after that and didn’t have dinner when I got back to the hotel, hours later!!

From Steni we made our way through Polis and on to the Baths of Aphrodites.

Baths of Aphrodites.


Baths of Aphrodites

This is one of the favourite haunts of the mythological goddess Aphrodite. Legend has it that after swimming in the crystal clear waters of the bay, she would walk up the hill and bathe in a pool fed by a freshwater mountain spring dripping down the sides of a shady grotto overhung by a leafy fig tree, which has come to be known as the Baths of Aphrodite. It is here that Adonis saw and fell in love with her while hunting in the Akamas forest. The Italian poet Ariosto wrote a poem about the area and its waters which became known as the Fontana Amorosa (Love Spring).


Female banded demoiselle damselfly


Male banded demoiselle damselfly


Snake-eyed Lizard (Ophisops elegans schlueteri)

After the Baths of Aphrodites we drove west along a very narrow single track, with a very steep drop into the sea on one side, it’s not for the faint hearted! I don’t think it’s something I’d attempt to drive along. Anyway the view is spectacular and the sea a really deep blue, another cote d’azure.







After that we paid a brief visit to a donkey farm.


Young donkey in pen


Mum I think

On the way back to the hotel we stopped off in a small village to experience some authentic Turkish coffee, which I duly had, it has to be drunk with some water to dilute it. It was interesting but whether I’d have it again I’m not sure!

Well that was the end of another interesting and wonderful day, would I do it again, without a shadow of doubt, definitely. Worth every euro. Thanks to Ecotour Adventures and Andreas and Chris who drove us on two great trips.

Thanks for reading.

Andy
The Troodos - EcoTours Adventures Cyprus
19th June 2015 - 0 comments
We had a full day trip to the Troodos through Ecotours Adventures Cyprus which took us to some of the less commercial areas and certainly well off the beaten track at times!

Our driver for the day was Chris whom was extremely passionate about the culture and the history of Cyprus and entertained our group throughout the day with his knowledge and wit.
I’m pleased to say he’s also a great driver as we drove on some extremely iffy roads/tracks.

We started our tour by driving south east from Paphos on the Limmasol road and our first stop was to see Aphrodites Rock.

Petra tou Romiou, a rock off the shore along the main road from Paphos to Limassol, has been regarded since ancient times as the birthplace of Aphrodite, goddess of love and fertility.
According to ancient tradition, Aphrodite was born from the waves on the site off the coast of Cyprus. In his Theogony (178-206), Hesiod provides the following dramatic account of the event:
Aphrodite was then escorted ashore on a shell by the soft breezes of the Zephyrs at the rocks known as Petra tou Romiou.

Petra tou Romiou means "the Rock of the Greek" and does not refer to Aphrodite but to another myth, that of the Byzantine hero Dighenis who threw the rocks at pirates to protect his lady.
It is said that in certain weather conditions, the waves rise, break and form a column of water that dissolves into a pillar of foam. With imagination, this looks for just a moment like an ephemeral, evanescent human shape.

There is a long narrow pebbly beach at Petra tou Romiou that extends to either side of the largest rock and its satellites.


Aphrodites rock from the west side


Aphrodites rock from the east side

From here we continued along the Limassol road and our next stop was to see one of the oldest olive trees in Cyprus at Avdimou.


The olive tree at Avdimou with girth 8,70m and estimated age 700 years

The cultivation of the olive tree began during the 2nd millennium BC but the earliest evidence of production of olive oil on the island goes back to the end of the 13th century BC.

The olive plant has had a huge role as a source of tradition, and as a symbol of wealth and abundance, glory and peace, honour and purity. Homer the great Greek poet referred to olive oil as ‘liquid gold’. The Olive has been, and still remains, more than mere food to the people of the Mediterranean – it has been used to crown victors in athletic games, war heroes and also ancient kings.

In many parts of the island there are groups of century old trees, known as “Frankoelies” and following an order of the Minister of Interior, many of these groups and other isolated
olive trees have been declared as protected, and the Department of Forests has the
responsibility of protecting and tending them.

From here we started to make our way to Omodus.


A typical Cypriot village en-route to Omodus

One of the most beautifull villages in Cyprus it nestles in the southern foothills of the Troodos Mountains. At an altitude of 900 meters, Omodos is in the centre of the famous wine making region of the country and is only a 30 minute drive from Limassol town.
The village is built around the Monastery of the Holy Cross which, according to records, dates back to the arrival of Saint Helena in Cyprus (A.D.337). The Monastery is home to a piece of the Holy Rope with which Christ’s hands were tied to the Cross.
In the centre of the Monastery an imposing Church stands having a gilded icon stand inside, dating back to 1817.





Within the Church valuable relics are kept such as fragments of saintly bones and the skull of Saint Philip.

In front of the Monastery there is a colourful, cobblestoned square covering an area of 3000m², surrounded by coffee houses, tavernas and shops. The square is the only one of its kind in Cyprus.



The medieval “Linos” (wine-press) is one of the oldest in Cyprus and a representative example of traditional craftsmanship and wine making techniques.


The wine press

The stop at Omodus was about 45mins long enough to wander around the church, the village, but a lace table cloth and have a drink at one of the tavernas.

Chantara or Foini Waterfall

Located near the Foini village, Chantara waterfall is just 1.5 km from Foini and about 3.5 km from the Trooditissa Monastery.

First there is a small wooden bridge that passes over the stream. On the left side you will hear and find the waterfall.

The water stream is split from the rock in the middle and gives the name of the waterfall. Chantara means a Scale or "weighing machine". The waterfall is not the highest or the biggest in Cyprus but it is said to be the most beautiful.


Chantara or Foini Waterfall

Compared to waterfalls in England it is a little lacking, Chris our driver recalled one English lady saying that her lavatory had more running water than the waterfall! Mind you with an estimated 320 days of sunshine each year it’s not surprising that there isn’t a massive flow of water.


Chantara or Foini Waterfall

It was very pleasant around the waterfall with numerous butterflies and lizards to be found.

On leaving the waterfall we went off road en-route to Pedoulas (sounds like it should be Wales) and we had only travelled a short distance when Chris spotted what he believed to be a Bonelli’s Eagle. I did get a look at it before it disappeared and reading up about it we were very lucky as it’s estimated that there are only about 20-40 pairs in Cyprus. Goshawks and Bonelli’s eagle are both possible in this area.

We carried on up the meandering dirt track climbing all the way and eventually we made road again.

The next photo was taken somewhere between Foini and Pedoulas and the view was wonderful and also made special by the singing of Nightingales that could be heard in the wooded valley below, beautiful.



Eventually we reached Pedoulas where we had lunch in a local tavern, the food was very nice and not expensive, unfortunately I don’t know the name of the taverna. I had stuffed vine leaves that were excellent along with a very nice local beer.


Rose at the taverna

After lunch we walked to one of the painted churches of the Troodos, The Church of Archangelos Michail. In 1985 it was inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List which includes nine other painted Byzantine churches of the Troodos range.



According to the dedicatory inscription above the north entrance, the church was built and decorated with frescoes in 1474, with the donation of priest Vasilios Chamados. The priest, accompanied by his wife and two daughters, is depicted above the dedicatory inscription, offering Archangel Michael a model of the church.



This church belongs to the typical single-aisled, timber-roof type of the Troodos region. The narthex, which extends to its south and west side, was used as a loft due to the small size of the church. The loft was used by the women, while only men entered the main church.



The church of Archangelos Michail is one of the few churches in Cyprus which preserves the name of the artist who decorated it. His name was Minas and he was a local painter who came from the area of Marathasa. Minas was a typical “naïve” painter with a conservative style, and followed the Byzantine tradition. However, he was aware of the artistic trends of this time and place which explains the influx of western elements in his work.
During this period many contemporary churches were decorated with wall-paintings of the same style.



On leaving Pedoulas we made our way to the Kykkos Monastery.



The Monastery of Kykkos, the richest and most lavish of the monasteries of Cyprus, is found in the region of Marathasa. It is situated on a mountain peak, at an altitude of 1318 metres northwest of Troodos. Dedicated to Panagia, it possesses one of three icons attributed to Agios Loukas the Evangelist. The icon, covered in silver gilt, is in a shrine made of tortoise shell and mother - of - pearl that stands in front of the iconostasis.



The monastery was founded sometime between the end of the 11th century and the beginning of the12th century, during the reign of Emperor Alexios I Komnenos (1081-1118 AD). Unfortunately the monastery burned down several times and nothing remains of the original structure. Blessed with divine grace, Cypriot hermit Isaiah miraculously cured the emperor's daughter of an incurable illness. As a reward, he asked for the icon of the Theotokos (Virgin Mary) kept at the imperial palace at Constantinople. Though grieved at the prospect of losing his precious treasure, the emperor sent it to Cyprus with fitting honours together with funds to pay for the construction of a monastery where the sacred relic would be kept. At the hermit's request, the emperor’s representative in Cyprus Manuel Vutomites also endowed the monastery with three villages. As the gift was later confirmed by imperial charter, the monastery is considered to have been established by imperial decree.





The first President of the Republic of Cyprus, Archbishop Makarios III, served here as a novice. At his own wish he was buried on the summit of Throni, 3 kilometres west of the monastery, and not far from his native village of Panayia.



After Kykkos we made our way to the village of Mylikouri and Chris was telling us about the population and unfortunately I can't remember exactly what he said. However it was something along the lines of that a once thriving village of about 2000 is now down to a about 20 people, mainly old people in their 70's.


Mylikouri

Most of the village houses are now holiday homes for people looking for rest and relaxation of a weekend and during the summer. This applies to most of the traditional villages in the Triodes. Most of the young people have left to find employment in the cities and coastal regions.

Mylikouri was the start of our descent into the Troodos Forest and our search for the elusive Mouflon.


Looking into the Troodos forest from Mylikouri

The mouflon is a subspecies group of the wild sheep. The mouflon is thought to be one of the two ancestors for all modern domestic sheep breeds.

We had a 30 minute walk through the forest but unfortunately the Mouflon remained elusive, a good excuse for another visit!

After the forest we made our way to one of the Venetian bridges in Cyprus, the Tzielefos bridge, Pera Vasa. Tzielefos bridge is found 5 kilometres from Agios Nikolaos, in the direction of Kaminaria. It is built on the Diarizos river, a river that has been called “barbarian” by the people, because of the great noise its waters make. Unfortunately there wasn't much water and it was more of a hush than a roar.


A pair of Cyprus tigers as Chris called them

Personally I didn't find the bridge that inspiring and I didn't photograph it. It appears however that it is a popular place for wedding photographers and there were three couples there having photos taken that I thought was more interesting.


Brides shoes on the venetian bridge


Bride & Groom

After the bridge our last stop was to look at the Arminou dam. The dam was built in 1998 on the river Diarizos at an altitude of about 300 meters and has capacity of 4.3 million cubic meters.





After that it was back to Paphos and the hotel.

This was an excellent trip, a great host in Chris and an excellent ambassador for his country. I can recommend the trip and at 40euro per person very reasonably priced.


The 4x4 Jeep used for the tour

Thanks for reading

Andy
23 May 15 Woolston Eyes
23rd May 2015 - 0 comments
A selection of photos that I haven't put in the galleries or uploaded to the Woolston Eyes website from that last three or four weeks.

For once I managed to get up early and I was on the Eyes for silly o'clock, about 05:45. As it happens the sun was shining and had a lovely golden glow.


Greylag Goose and chicks feeding in the early morning sun


Greylag Goose and reflection


Greylag Goose and chicks


Little Grebe with the reeds reflecting in the water


Chiffchaff

Some of the action from in front of the John Morgan Hide


Black-headed Gulls mating


Gadwall in the early morning sun

Shelducks being their usual aggressive selves.






Tufted duck on the South Pool

A week later.


Lesser black-backed Gulls


Lesser black-backed Gulls mating on the scrape


Lapwing and two eggs in the nest

The Lapwing is still sitting on the two eggs today.


Black-headed Gull


Lesser black-backed Gull preparing for lift off

There have been a few small waders, Ringed Plover, Little Ringed Plover, Dunlin and Sanderling visiting the scrape over the last few weeks. Unfortunately I've only seen the Little Ringed Plover.


Little ringed Plover

Some photos from this weekend.


Herring Gull - Probably 1st Winter


Little ringed Plover


Gadwall in flight

There wasn't much discernable colour in the above photo so I converted it to monochrome.


Black-headed Gull in flight

There are plenty of chicks around at the moment.


Canada Goose chicks


Canada Goose chicks in a huddle


Canada Goose chicks following mum


Mute Swan


Lapwing still sitting on the nest - there were some Greylag goose chicks very close to her and she was calling.


Pied Wagtail


View from the John Morgan Hide

I've tried to include some action photos, some cute with the chicks and some that I just like and deserve to be seen.

I hope you enjoyed them and thanks for looking.

cheers

Andy
26 April 15 Woolston Eyes
28th April 2015 - 1 comment
I made my way to “The Eyes” on Sunday and as I crossed the footbridge the Chiffchaffs were apparent and like last week there was a Chiffchaff on the lower branches of a tree. This week I did get a reasonable photo and it’s probably the best I’ve managed to take so far, even though its tail is hidden behind a branch.


Chiffchaff

On reaching the John Morgan Hide there were the usual suspects on the scrape, Black-headed Gull, Moorhen, Coot, Canada Goose, Greylag Goose, Lapwing and Shelduck.


Lapwing


Greylag Goose

On the water I could see Teal, Pochard, Tufted Duck, Gadwall, Great-crested Grebe, Little Grebe, Mute Swan, Lesser black-backed Gull, Cormorant and Shoveler.


Shoveler

The Shovelers (male & female) waddled onto the scrape something I haven’t seen before.


Shoveler

An Oyster catcher dropped onto the scrape.


Oyster Catcher

The Lapwing seemed to take umbrage and swooped over it frequently.


Lapwing & Oyster Catcher


Lapwing & Oyster Catcher

As I made my way back I saw a largish bird fly behind a small tree but I couldn’t see it from where I was. As I passed the tree I looked up and there was a Kestrel hovering not too far away. As luck would have it I’d done something I don’t normally do and left the camera on the tripod, All I had to do was place it down and focus, yippee, some decent shots of another of my bogey birds!!

[
Kestrel


Kestrel

Thanks for reading.

Andy
22 April 15 Woolston Eyes NR
22nd April 2015 - 0 comments
Tuesday morning was so nice I decided to take a holiday in the afternoon and take myself and the camera to Woolston Eyes NR. I was hoping to get my first decent photo of the year of a Black-necked Grebe or anything else that came within photographing distance really.

As I walked along the south bank the Chiffchaffs were calling and from the lower branches which combined with not much foliage on the trees should have made it easier to get a decent photo. All attempts failed, very disappointing!!

From the south pool viewing platform, a Grey Heron was strutting its stuff along the edge of the pool but there wasn’t much else in sight, a couple of Gadwall, Black-headed Gulls, Coots and Moorhens.


Grey Heron

After a few minutes I made my way to the John Morgan Hide and lo and behold the Grey Heron had followed me.


Grey Heron


Apart from the Grey Heron, there were Greylag Goose, Canada Goose, Black-headed Gulls, Lapwing, Coot and Moorhen on the scrape.


Lapwing

The way the Lapwing was behaving I thought it may lay an egg on the scrape but it didn’t while I was there.


Lapwing

On the water I could see Teal, Shoveller, Gadwall, Great crested Grebe, Little Grebe, Black-necked Grebe, Lesser black-backed Gull, Mute Swan and Pochard.


Greylag Goose



Gadwall


Moorhen

Unforunately the Black-necked Grebe stayed well away and didn’t venture within photographing distance as did most of the other birds. However a Pied Wagtail dropped in on the scrape and a couple of Buzzards scattered the birds just to make the afternoon a bit more interesting.


Pied Wagtail

Eventually I made my way to the Rotary Hide as I have taken some nice photos of Black-necked Grebe from this hide. There were about six birds that could be seen intermittently from this vantage point. Unfortunately they were at some distance or swimming behind the reeds, extremely irritating!

Anyway I did have a go at a distant bird and as you will be able to tell from the photo it really was distant.


Black-necked Grebe

I've also included a few photos from a couple of weeks ago when I visited Woolston but I didn't upload them to my website.


Crow on No3 Bed


Black-headed Gull, No3 Bed


View from south pool viewing platform, converted to mono and given a slight tint


Same photo but I tried to produce an infra red type effect and added some grain to it

Thanks for reading

Andy
23 March 2015 - Woolston Eyes
24th March 2015 - 0 comments
I'd taken a days holiday yesterday and managed to visit "The Eyes" again albeit late in the afternoon.

When I arrived at the John Morgan Hide I was pleased to see the Mediterranean Gull that had been around for a while and the scrape had more than it's fair share of Canada Geese, Mute Swans and Greylag Geese on it. I also saw the female Marsh Harrier that has been around for a few weeks but it didn't come within a photographable distance.

Some of the birds that were around follow however the Mediterranean Gull gets more than it's fair share of coverage.



Mediterranean Gull


Mediterranean Gull


Mediterranean Gull


Mediterranean Gull


Mediterranean Gull


Mediterranean Gull being chased by Black-headed gull


Mediterranean Gull being chased by Black-headed gull


Mediterranean Gull


Mediterranean Gull


Great crested grebe displaying


Black-headed Gull


Black-headed Gull


Black-headed Gull


Black-headed Gull


Male Pochard


Female Pochard


Female Gadwall


Male Teal


Lesser black-backed gull


Canada Goose lit by the warm glow of the setting sun


Canada Goose lit by the warm glow of the setting sun

thanks for reading

Andy
20 March 2015 At The Eyes
22nd March 2015 - 0 comments
I spent a few hours at Woolston Eyes on Saturday morning and I'd only just reached the south pool viewing screen when the gulls went into panic mode. It took a few seconds to identify the culprit and I just managed to get a couple of shots in before a female Marsh Harrier went down in the reed bed.


Marsh Harier - Marsh Harrier (Circus aeruginosus)

Although it isn't a good photo I am pleased with it as the bird was at least 200yds away and the cameras autofocus locked onto the bird almost immediately, pretty impressive I think. Unfortunately I didn't see it again.

There wasn't much around but a selection of what was appears below.


Black-headed Gull


Black-headed Gull in flight


Grey Heron being chased by gulls


Shoveler


Shelduck landing on the centre pool


Greylag Goose


Coot after the not unexpected squabble

Thanks for reading

Andy
07 March 15 Woolston Eyes
08th March 2015 - 0 comments
I made a long overdue visit to Woolston Eyes on Saturday, the last time I visited was on the 1st November.
Its also the first time I’ve had the opportunity to use my new 7D Mk II camera with the 500mm Mk II lens and I also used the MkIII x2 extender.

My initial thoughts are that the camera performs much better than the its predecessor the 7D Mk 1 and probably as good as the 5D Mk III with the 500mm Mk I lens.

The autofocus of the 7D MkII also appeared to be much better than the 5D Mk III especially with the extender attached.

Obtaining good photographs of the birds on the water at Woolston is a challenge and with this combination of equipment I do feel better equipped to get a higher proportion of good quality photographs.

Saturday was quite pleasant and the light was good so that helped quite a bit.
I spent most of the time at the John Morgan hide and there was quite a bit of gull activity, mainly Black-headed gulls from the breeding colony.


Black-headed gull


Black-headed gull - squabbling as they do best!

Some young Lesser Black-backed gulls were also apparent.


Lesser Black-backed gull


Lesser Black-backed gull


Lesser Black-backed gull

There were also Mallard, Gadwall, Tufted Duck, Pochard, Shoveller, Great crested grebe, Coot, Moorhen, Canada goose, Greylag goose, and Mute Swan on the water.


Coot


Coot


Moorhen


Greylag Goose


Mute Swan


Shelduck


Shelduck


Great crested grebe


Great crested grebe


Tufted duck


Mallard

While I was looking around there was quite a lot of evidence that something is using the shelter of the hide to enjoy eating it's kill


The recent remains


The recent remains

Thanks for reading.

Andy
31 Jan 15 City Walk
02nd February 2015 - 0 comments
On Saturday I’d arranged for my best friend Barry and I to attend a City Photo Walk in Liverpool run by Aidan O’Rourke. Photography in the city is well out of my comfort zone as I’m more at home in a hide photographing birds, landscapes when the opportunity arises or perhaps some indoor photography.

I think there were seven people all together attending the walk. The first 45 minutes or so were spent discussing setting up the camera to get the best out of it, particularly the correct exposure. Four or five printed sheets were also supplied explaining this particularly the relationship between, aperture, shutter speed and ISO.

Aidan is enthusiastic and passionate about photography and very patient and spent a lot of time explaining things to the less experienced photographers. His photographs of Liverpool and Manchester have appeared in many books and newspapers, so he is a well-established photographer.

The Walk.

We spent some time around St George’s Hall and although on the face of it there didn’t appear to be a lot to photograph, a bit of looking around reveals lots. Then it isn’t only the taking of the photograph, for me there is also the researching of the subject that’s been photographed, not to mention producing the finished photograph. The really good photographers can take a photograph in camera that doesn’t require any editing in Photoshop but I haven’t achieved those lofty heights yet.

I think I work back to front and instead of going out and taking a photograph that I’ve visualised, I’ll take a photograph and try and make it into something that I like.


The former North Western Hotel is on the east side of Lime Street, Liverpool, England. It is designated by English Heritage a Grade II listed building. The hotel was built in 1871 as a railway hotel by the London and North Western Railway to serve Lime Street Station. It was designed by Alfred Waterhouse, and contained 330 rooms. The hotel closed in 1933 and remained empty and unused for over 60 years. In 1994 it was bought by John Moores University and, at a cost of £6 million, was converted into a hall of residence for students, which opened in 1996


Looking along Lime Street towards the Crown Hotel with the Anglican Cathedral in the background. The Crown Hotel was built in 1905 in Art Nouveau style. It is constructed in brick with some stucco, and has marble facing on the ground floor. The building is in three storeys with an attic. It has two fronts, one on Lime Street with two bays, the other on Skelhorne Street, with three bays.It is designated by English Heritage as a Grade II listed building.


Part of the wall St George's Hall


The above transformed in Photoshop

After that we made our way to the Anglican Cathedral passing The Adelphi Hotel, the old Lewis’s department store, St Luke’s Church (aka The bombed out church), the Chinese Arch, Nelson St, “Chinatown” and finally the Anglican Cathedral. During the walk Aidan pointed out the main points of interest.


The former Lewis's Department Store and Dicky Lewis Sculpture


The Chinese Arch, Nelson Street, China Town. In year 2000, a Chinese Ceremonial Archway was constructed at the top of Nelson Street. It became a local landmark and a tourist attraction. The structure was imported piece by piece from Shanghai, and then reconstructed by craftsmen from China. There are 200 dragons on the wooden and marble structure with a mixture of stunning gold, red, green and the Chinese Royal colour of yellow. The archway stands at 15m high, which is the largest in Europe. According to Feng Shui experts, it will protect Chinatown from evil, and bring good luck and fortune to the area.


The Chinese Arch, Nelson Street, China Town


Frame within a frame. From the chinese Arch looking back towards St Luke's Church (aka The bombed out church


The Anglican Cathedral from the corner of Upper Duke Street and Cathedral Gate. The cathedral was designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott (1880 - 1960). The building of the cathedral was started in 1903 or shortly afterwards and was completed in 1978, twenty-eight years after Sir Giles Gilbert Scott had died in 1960.


The Benedicite Window above the West Door and Tracy Emin's artwork "For You" below it. For You was commissioned by the Cathedral Chapter as the Cathedral’s contribution to Liverpool’s Year as European Capital of Culture 2008. It is a pink neon, written in the artist’s handwriting, with the words: ‘I felt you and I knew you loved me.’ In 2009 Tracy Emin was the winner of the Art and Christianity Enquiry (ACE) Award for Art in a Religious Context for this work. The previous year this work also enabled the Cathedral to win the first Liverpool Chamber of Commerce Arts Award.Anglican Cathedral, Liverpool, Merseyside


All Together Now, a sculpture commemorating the World War One Christmas truce. Two fibreglass figures, about to shake hands, capture the moment British and German soldiers stopped fighting and played football on Christmas Day 1914. The statue was designed by Andy Edwards.

If you are a beginner in photography I can certainly recommend one of Aidan’s walks in Liverpool or Manchester as it isn’t expensive as workshops go, so if this has whetted your appetite you can find out more here:

www.aidan.co.uk

Thanks for reading.

Andy
For Sale Canon 500mm F4.0 Lens Mk1
02nd January 2015 - 0 comments
Due to upgrade Canon 500mm F4.0 Telephoto Lens Mk1, no issues, some loss of paint in usual areas (tripod mount, etc). Includes case, lens hood, lens cap, etc. £3500.

If anyone interested email.
01 November 14 "The Eyes"
03rd November 2014 - 1 comment
When I awoke on Saturday morning, the sunlight wasn’t exactly streaming through the curtains but it was light and it wasn’t raining.

So after a filling breakfast I made my way to “Woolston Eyes” which is only about 15mins away, The light was quite good, still no rain and only a light breeze so I was hoping that I’d get some reasonable photographs or spot one those elusive rarities that up to now has escaped me.

As there always is there were plenty of cars by the footbridge across to the reserve but from experience that doesn’t mean an awful lot as most of them belong to the ringers and generally you don’t see them or you get a brief glimpse of one in the distance, the lesser spotted ringer.

As I walked across the footbridge over the bund, there was a cormorant quite close and some ducks in the distance but nothing I could get a decent photograph of so I made my way to the south viewing screen. The water was still quite low even after the recent rain and there certainly wasn’t anything close enough to photograph, not even a coot or moorhen. It was quite pleasant just to stand and stare for a while as the sound of birdsong drifted across the water but it was only the ringers playing one of their tapes.

After a while I made my way to the tower hide looking out for any birds or insects that I could photograph but nothing jumped out and grabbed my attention. On reaching the hide it was obvious that a lot of hard work had been done to clear the reed in front of the hide. Unfortunately it didn’t help me to see anything.

After a while I decided to go to the John Morgan Hide and on the way I found a couple of Hoverflies to photograph.


Marmalade Fly (Eristalis pertinax)


Tapered Drone Fly (Episyrphus balteatus)

On reaching the John Morgan Hide I opened one of the windows under the hide and unusually there was nothing on the scrape, no Canada Geese or Lapwing, there was absolutely nothing. I waited expectantly but nothing other than a couple of Moorhens ventured near the scrape. Consequently the photographs I took were long distance shots and required some heavy cropping so the quality isn’t very good.


Shoveler (Anas clypeata)

The Shovelers and other waterfowl were panicked and put to flight by a Buzzard hunting over the reserve but the panic diminished as quickly as it started and the birds settled down again, you’ve got it, on the far side of the pool.


Shoveler (Anas clypeata) landing on the far side of the pool


Buzzard (Buteo buteo) that put the other birds to flight.


Black-headed gull (Chroicocephalus ridibundus) splash landing

Elsewhere on the reserve I found some fungi and a Comma butterfly.


Shaggy Scalycap (Pholiota squarrosa)


Shaggy Parasol (Chlorophyllum rhacodes)


Glistening Inkcap (Coprinellus micaceus)


Comma (Polygonia c-album)

Thanks for reading.

Andy
15 Oct 2014 Trip to Norfolk
15th October 2014 - 1 comment
We had a nice break in North Norfolk a couple of weeks back for some rest and relaxation. However you can’t go to Norfolk and not visit some of the reserves.

The list of our sightings is detailed below.

Birds: Little Grebe, Great crested Grebe, Cormorant, Grey Heron, Little Egret, Mute Swan, Brent Geese, Greylag Geese, Pinkfeet, Egyptian Geese, Mallard, Wigeon, Shoveller, Teal, Tufted Duck, Pochard, Kestrel, Hobby, Buzzard, Marsh Harrier, Pheasant, Red legged Partridge, Coot, Moorhen, Ringed Plover, Grey Plover, Golden Plover, Lapwing, Turnstone, Dunlin, Avocet, Oystercatcher, Black tailed Godwit, Bar tailed Godwit, Curlew, Snipe, Ruff, Redshank, Curlew Sandpiper, Greater Black backed Gull, Lesser Black Backed Gull, Herring Gull, Caspian Gull, Yellow legged Gull, Common Gull, Black Headed Gull, Wood Pigeon, Collared Dove, Green Woodpecker, Skylark, Pied Wagtail. Robin, Blackbird, Cetti’s Warbler (heard) Goldcrest, Wren, Nuthatch (heard) Great Tit, Blue Tit, Long tailed Tit, Bearded Tit, Kingfisher, Magpie, Jay, Starling, Crow, Jackdaw, Rook, Chaffinch, Siskin.

Mammals: Fallow Deer, Red Deer, Hare, Grey Squirrel, Grey Seal, Common Seal

Butterflies: Speckled Wood, Red Admiral.

Odonata: Migrant Hawker, Red Darter, Ruddy Darter.

Amphibians: Common Frog

Four of the birds were my first sightings, Curlew Sandpiper, Bearded Tit, Caspian Gull and Yellow-legged Gull. I was unable to get photographs of the Tits and Sandpiper but I did manage to get some photos of the Gulls.


Caspian Gull (Larus cachinnans)


Yellow-legged Gull (Larus michahellis)

Like the Caspian Gull the Yellow Legged Gull was once considered a race of Herring Gull. Modern techniques in DNA analysis have however determined they are both a separate and distinct species in their own right.

A move away from the coast produced good views of Fallow Deer and Brown Hare.

We spent some time photographing the deer which were just coming into rut and getting quite vocal as well as frisky.


Fallow Deer Stag – scent marking

This magnificent Stag seemed to be ruling the heard as he chased off rivals from his Harem.


Fallow Deer Stag


Fallow Deer

As we were photographing the deer we obviously disturbed this hare which hurtled off stage right.


Brown Hare Brown Hare (Lepus europaeus)

A boat trip to Blakeny Point gave us lovely views of Grey Seal and Harbour or Common Seal.


Common Seal (Phoca vitulina)


Grey Seal (Halichoerus grypus)

Thanks for reading.

Andy
18 May 14 In the Garden
19th May 2014 - 0 comments
As I didn't get out and about with the camera on Sunday, I spent some time in the garden photographing the birds that frequent our garden and make use of the feeders.

We don't get a great range of birds but they are reasonably colourful and as entertaining as some of the programs on the television.


Starling

The boss of the garden appears to be the blackbirds that chase anything that lands.

Frequent visitors are collared dove and the wood pigeon (aka the tank) that have developed their own technique of getting seed out of the feeders, it is quite funny to watch them.


Wood pigeon a.k.a. the tank


Collared dove

Other birdy visitors were dunnock, robin, blue tit, greenfinch and goldfinch.


Greenfinch


Goldfinch


Robin


Greenfinch

cheers

Andy
17 May 2014 At "The Eyes"
19th May 2014 - 1 comment
I made my weekly visit to “The Eyes” on a lovely warm & brightly lit Saturday morning with the hope of getting some decent warbler shots but more realistically in the hope that something/anything would be close enough to take a reasonable photograph of it.

Well the sky was blue, the clouds white and fluffy and not a lot of wind so nice conditions really. Lots of the trees are in blossom and I liken them to foaming fountains of flowers, I suppose you call that flowery writing!

There wasn’t much to be seen from the first viewing screen so I made my way to the John Morgan Hide.


Flag Iris from the south pool viewing screen

On the short walk I could hear plenty of birds in song, Chiffchaff, Sedge and other warblers but could I see any of them, could I heck.

On the scrape were the usual suspects, black-headed gulls, Canada geese, greylag geese, gadwall, mallard, shelduck, coot, lapwing, mute swan and on the water, black-necked grebe, great crested grebe, little grebe, tufted duck, pochard, lesser black-backed gulls etc.


Gadwall


Mute Swan on the runway


Lapwing

It was very quiet and not much bird activity, the wood mouse that I've seen for the last couple of weeks had deserted as well.

As I said there wasn't much activity and certainly nothing unusual to see but the birds are always doing something and then there are the cute chicks.


Canada goose chicks

While I was there David Bowman pointed out a couple of nests that had been made under the hide but weren't being used or had been abandoned.





After that I wandered down tho the Rotary Hide where a coot and chicks were spending their time but other than that not a lot to see.


Coot feeding chick

I then retraced my steps and went back to the Tower Hide in the hope of photographing some Warblers. There were a few around but nothing ventured close to the hide, I did manage a few photos but they weren't much good.


Sedge Warbler

Thanks for reading.

Andy
11 May 14 Visit to Woolston Eyes
11th May 2014 - 0 comments
Although rain had been forecast I made my way to Woolston Eyes NR, my local reserve. It was raining when I started out but it eased off and although the sun didn’t exactly crack the heavens there were some bright patches.

There had been a few interesting birds been seen recently, Mediterranean gull, Garganey, little gull and great white egret. I wasn’t expecting to see any of those so I wasn’t disappointed when I didn’t.

At the first viewing screen a couple of male ruddy duck could be seen , along with pochard, Canada goose, shelduck and the obligatory coots.

I then made my way to the John Morgan Hide and although there wasn’t anything unusual or exciting there’s always something to see. On the scrape in front of the hide there were mainly black-headed gulls, shelduck, Gadwall, mute swan, greylag geese, lapwing and Canada goose.


Mute Swan


Greylag Goose

There were a few lesser black-backed gulls flying around and one flew onto the scrape carrying an eel, better than a chick anyway.


Lesser black-backed gull


Lesser black-backed gull

As usual the shelduck and the black headed gulls were being their usual selves but unusually the gull was chasing the shelduck!


Shelduck and Black-headed gull


Shelduck and Black-headed gull

Plenty of displaying and mating to be seen.


Black-headed gull

Although thee gulls were quite noisy most of the morning it was nothing compared to when a marsh harrier made an appearance on the far side of the pool opposite the hide.It certainly got the gulls excited!

I did manage to get a photo which isn't very good due to it being so far away but there isn't much you can do about it.


Marsh harrier

thanks for reading.

Andy